Alien (1979)

A blue-collar spaceship picks up an odd signal. Upon investigation, the crew finds a wrecked alien ship and a sea of slimy eggs. After the eye-opening hatching of one of the little fellas, and they decide to get the hell out of Dodge. But it is far too late.

Alien is a masterful melding of sci-fi and horror. The alien is as grotesque as it is intimidating and one of the best-designed creatures ever (kudos to H.R. Giger). The rest of the designs are equally impressive. Combine all of this with Ridley Scott’s penchant for visual storytelling, and you have a film that changed both sci-fi and horror (for the better).

Final report. Alien is still a harrowing experience and a voyage to space that all cultists must endure. This is your Cult Caretakers, signing off.

Directed by Ridley Scott.
Starring Sigourney Weaver, Tom Skerritt, Veronica Cartwright, Harry Dean Stanton, John Hurt, Ian Holm and Yaphet Kotto.
117 Minutes – Rated R

20 Million Miles to Earth (1957)

Seventeen Astronauts journey to Venus only to meet disaster in various forms. The returning spacecraft splashes down off Italy with three occupants, and one is fixin’ to get seriously pissed off. Can William Hopper save the day with his “no speaka da English” sidekicks? No matter, the plot has little to do with our recommendation.

The real star of this creature feature is, of course, the Ymir, Ray Harryhausen’s dynamic concept of a beast from another world. At once terrifying and sympathetic, Y-Man’s performance from hatchling to adulthood is by far the best thing this classic has to offer. You can’t help but feel disdain for the inept Earthlings and pity for the monster.

Y-Man, Y-man, he’s our man, if he can’t do it, no one can.

Directed b Nathan H Juran.
Starring William Hopper, Joan Taylor and Frank Puglia.
81 Minutes – Not Rated